Do’s And Don’ts When Getting A New Puppy! 

Goldendoodle Breeder

 

• Do not let the puppy near stairs alone until he/she has entirely mastered them under strict supervision.

 

• Do not let your puppy run up and down stairs repeatedly.  Your puppies joints need to develop and constant running up and down stairs can affect them in the future.  We recommend limited stairs until they are 1 year old.

 

• Do not take your puppy for a 10 kilometer run the week you take it home.  As above, your puppy’s joints need to develop and too much exercise can greatly affect them.  We strongly recommend limited exercise until they are 1 year old.  Build up your walks with your puppy, but do not overdo it.  

 

• Do not pick the puppy up by the scruff of the neck.

 

• Do not allow children to roughhouse or maul the puppy. You wouldn't let the neighborhood kids do so with your ten-week old baby. Puppies aren't any different.

 

• Do not feed a puppy rawhide, as it does not digest well and can create problems.  We recommend not feeding rawhide to adult dogs also.  

 

• Do get you puppy a tennis ball to play with when they are young – but when they grow up switch it to an orange hockey ball.  Tennis balls are great for young puppy’s, easy to hold onto and chase.  When your puppy gets a little bigger, they will start chewing the felt and split the ball.  The tennis balls can become trapped in their throat as they are springy rubber – so switch to a hockey ball when your puppy keeps it in their mouth and constantly chews.

 

• Do keep the puppy well confined during the first several weeks home. A puppy that gets loose may wander away and forget, or not know where home is.

 

• Do housebreak and train your dog with kindness and attention to detail.  A helpful tip is to hang a bell from the door knob.  Ring it whenever you take the puppy out to go to the bathroom.  Quickly, they will learn to ring it for you to let you know it is time to go out.  You can find more info on line “Bell Training”.

• Keep in mind, that puppy bladders are usually not large enough to last the entire night until they are around 4-6 months old.  After every meal, puppies should be taken outside – they go multiple times; a full stomach puts pressure on the bladder and colon.  Use a word, which helps to train you puppy.  Our dogs all know the word “Hurry Up”.  We start is as a statement (Good Hurry Up), and then as they grow form it as a question to them (Do you need to Hurry Up?), they reply by letting us know they need out.  As they go we advise them “Good Hurry Up”.  Watch for signs of puppy’s needing out, whining, going in circles.  More attention early makes your life easier later.

 

• Do take your puppy outside to go to the bathroom on a leash.  Go outside to the spot you want them to use and just stand their in the same spot instead of wandering around.  If you stand in the same spot, your puppy will have a circle around you that they soon become bored of and then they remember what they are there for.  If you go to a spot, and then after 2 minutes move 3 feet to the left – you have just doubled their area of exploration.  It might take up to 20 minutes the first few times – but stick it out and it will be worth it.

 

• Do get up in the middle of the night for the first few nights and take your puppy outside. If you take your puppy outside they will go to the bathroom and then go back to sleep.  If your puppy has to become frantic and wake you up and then go outside to the bathroom – they will be wide awake and not ready to go back to sleep.

 

• Do give your puppy all the love and attention you can possibly spare. He/she is going to need it and will return it to you, with triple digit interest.

 

• Do hook the leash onto your puppy’s collar and let them drag it around the house the first day to get familiar with it.  If you go thru a period where your puppy stays just out of reach as a game – leave the leash attached and that gives you an extra 5-6 feet to be able to catch your puppy.

 

• Do let your puppy run around outside in supervised area’s without their leash.  They will explore but it will also teach them to come back to you.  If you have ever heard of a dog that ran away the second it was off the leash – that’s because they were always on the leash and did not understand what it was like to be free – so they took full advantage of it.

 

• Do not use a crate for discipline, it is for supervision only.

 

• Do consider reading up, we found that “Dogs for Dummies” is a great book and provides help for most situations – but keep in mind not everything they recommend is perfect for all puppy’s and family’s.

 

• Do sign up for puppy school and at least one additional level of training . Talk to people you meet and find out where they went.  There are some training classes / schools where multiple people are allowed to attend (we recommend).  If you are attending one where only the puppy handler goes – as soon as school is over, return home and replay everything you learned to the entire family – so that you are prepared for next week.    Some schools will allow you to start after your puppy has had his second vaccinations; some require your puppy to have his 3rd set of vaccinations.

 

• Do not be afraid look at recommended dog schools outside your immediate area. You want your dog to learn about being confident around other dogs and people, you want them to learn that the human members of your family are in charge and the leaders.  You want your puppy to develop a work ethic that starts with treats and repetition to learn, and you want help to teach your puppy good life skills (what is acceptable and what is not).  You also want to make sure that Positive Reinforcement is the method of training that your school uses.  

 

• Do ask to attend a training class as an observer, and don’t be afraid to ask some of the dog owners about their experiences with the school.

 

• Do take a couple of different kinds of treats – something really soft and smelly that you always use for teaching important lessons and broken up pieces of milk bones.

 

• Do not feed your puppy dinner before you go to school, if they are hungry they will work harder for the treat reward and learn faster.

 

•Do not leave a collar on your puppy while they are unattended in the house, as it could pose a strangulation risk to an inquisitive puppy.

 

• Do consider a “Gentle Leader” for your 

puppy if they get to the stage and start to take over walks for you.  When put on and used properly a gentle leader is a wonderful tool to help your puppy.  We did not believe in them. But tried one at puppy school and it immediately changed our puppy’s attitude.  Instead of having to work hard, our job became extremely easy and we both had a much better experience at school.

 

• Do purchase some hard bones for your puppy, we find that the Rollover ones are extremely hard and last forever.  Do not purchase dog bones from a pet store (etc..) that are white.  They are from places that do not have the standards that we have and they have been extremely bleached just to be allowed into the country.

 

• Do provide leadership for your puppy.  Dogs are pack animals and will treat your entire family like their pack.  Problems occur when dogs rank themselves about the human members of the pack.  Dogs need and want a pack leader.  Some simple tips are (1) make your puppy wait until you go through the doorway first (2) make your puppy move out of your way – do not go around him/her if they are standing, sitting or lying in your path (3) elevation is important – do not allow your puppy onto your furniture or beds until the pecking order is established – so keep this in mind if you play with your puppy on the floor – when you are at their level – “it’s Playtime”, but when you get up “you are the boss” – teach them to settle when you stand up from playtime (4) feed your puppy after your family has eaten.  Always remember that you are IN CHARGE and the pack leader. If you have children you will also have to ensure that they understand this and you will have to help them to rank higher on the pack list than your puppy – but also keep in mind that if you make the correction – that just establishes you as the leader – not your children.  

 

• Do expect to learn more from dog school than your dog does, and to take that information home and apply it to everyday life, which will help your puppy to fit into your family and your extended family and everyone you meet.

 

• Do make sure everyone involved in the housebreaking process is using the same spot in the yard, using the same word etc.. 

 

• Do establish a list of words for your puppy and family to learn and use.  One of the harder ones to keep sorted out is down and off.  Down should be a command to “lay down”, off should mean “get off” whatever you are on (me, couch, jumping on people, etc.)  Keep the wording short to start, and as the puppy grows you will be able to form sentences around the words and they will understand.

 

• Do become consistent and keep to a schedule.  Create a routine around your puppy.  This will help to train your puppy faster and easier.  Everyone must help and work on keeping the schedule and routine.

 

• Do trim your puppy’s toenails weekly, and if nothing needs to be trimmed go through the motions so that they are always used to having their feet held on to.

 

• Do not scold your puppy for things they have done wrong – if you did not catch them in the act.  They have an extremely short attention span and most times will have no idea why they are in trouble (even if it is 5 seconds later).

 

• Do understand that submissive urination is NOT a house training problem.  When dogs are young they will sometimes urinate when they greet other dogs or people.  It is a sign in canine terms that the puppy is acknowledging the dominance of other dogs or people.  Puppy’s have NO Control over this behavior so you must NOT scold them for it (it will make it worse if you do).  The best thing to do is ignore it and try to prevent it through better management.  Have the puppy go to the bathroom immediately before guests come over, don’t let people bend over and enthusiastically greet your puppy when they immediately meet.

 

• Do realize puppies chew everything.  They are new to this world and need a taste of anything that they can reach, pull on or sleep on.  They are just exploring, and without hands – everything goes into the mouth for inspection.  You will be amazed at what they can reach.

 

• Do expect stuffed toys to be ruffed up.  We regularly have stuffed frogs or ducks missing hands, feet, the squeaker, the stuffing and they still play away with the remaining flattened body.  Just make sure to throw out any small pieces that they have removed before the try to eat them, because they will.

 

• Do rotate toys and bones etc.. so they do not become bored

 

• Do always manage the environment around the house / puppy.

• Praise and encouragement are the most effective methods of training.  Is it more work, yes.

 

• Do become consistent with everything you and your puppy do, and always reward good behavior.

 

• Do limit the amount of soft treats you give to a puppy, as they are harder on their stomachs.  

 

*Do keep in mind that if you do not always have your eye’s on your puppy and they do something wrong, to take that piece of rolled up newspaper and hit YOURSELF. What were you thinking?*